Posts tagged ‘food’

Sourdough Applesauce Bread

While I like to think of myself as a minimalist, someone who doesn’t have a whole lot of stuff, the truth is, I just don’t have as much stuff as the majority of people, and the reason for this is mainly do to moving internationally three times in three years and living in a tiny apartment that doesn’t allow me space to store stuff.

Despite this, I have now lived in the same apartment for over two years (This may not seem like a lot, but I haven’t lived in any one place for longer than a year since I went away to college), and it’s funny how the longer you live in one place, the more stuff you accumulate. Not just that, but you don’t even realize you’re accumulating large quantities of things until the time comes to move, and you start pulling things out of cabinets and closets and *gasp* the garage and realize just how much stuff you have.

Fortunately, I don’t have a garage, so that’s one less storage nightmare to worry about. I do have clothes though. Lots of clothes.

Honestly, I didn’t think I had so many clothes you see. I hardly ever buy clothes here in Japan, as most of the clothes look like they were made for children (that’s how I say “They don’t fit me” in a way that doesn’t damage my self-esteem), and I don’t buy so many clothes when I go back to the U.S. to visit…I think.

Yet when I started going through my closet last week to find clothes I don’t need anymore and can get rid of, I ended up with a whole box. That may not seem like a lot, but I already had two other boxes full of clothes to get rid of.

How did I accumulate so many clothes? Where did they all come from? It’s very mysterious and perplexing…

So last weekend, when Hisa and I went to get rid of the clothes at a donation place, I told my Hisa how I thought it was terribly mysterious and perplexing that I had all these clothes, and I couldn’t figure out how I had accumulated them all, thinking that, he too, would find it mysterious and perplexing. Instead he just rolled his eyes and guffawed at me. He then told me that he wanted me to remember that moment every time I walked into a clothing store.

….I can’t imagine what he meant by that. *cough*

At least I thought it was perplexing.
I recently found myself craving some yummy quick bread for breakfast, however, I wanted it to be healthy, not too sweet, and I wanted to use some of my sourdough starter in it.

After some playing around in my kitchen, I came up with this bread. It’s made with whole-wheat flour, applesauce, honey, sourdough starter, 1 egg, a little salt, and some spices. I put nuts and raisins in mine, but any dried fruit or even chocolate chips would work well. Hisa and I ate it with my homemade apple butter on it, but it would also be good with butter, honey, or jam on it. It was slightly sweet, but not overly sweet like some quick breads. All in all, it’s a very yummy bread, but healthy enough that it won’t make you feel guilty to eat it for breakfast or for a snack. Next time I think I’ll add banana to make it a sourdough banana-nut bread.

Sourdough Applesauce Bread

  • 1 c. whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 tsp. sea salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 c. sourdough starter
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 c. apple sauce
  • 1/2 c. honey (more if you want a sweeter bread)
  • optional: 1/2 c. raisins, nuts, dried fruit, chocolate chips. etc.
  1. Pre-heat oven to 180 degrees C (355 degrees F), and butter or spray a 9 x 5 inch loaf pan.
  2. In a large bowl, combine flour, salt, baking soda, and spices.
  3. In a medium bowl, mix sourdough starter, vanilla, egg, and apple sauce together.
  4. Pour starter mixture into the bowl with the flour mixture. Add any add ins, such as nuts and raisins. Mix everything just until ingredients are incorporated. Try not to over mix.
  5. Pour batter into prepared loaf pan and bake for 30 – 40 minutes, or until top is golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the center of the bread comes out clean.

April 19, 2011 at 4:19 pm Leave a comment

Asian Lettuce Wraps

Yay! It’s Friday! *does TGIF dance*

For whatever reason, I’ve mistakenly thought that everyday this week was Friday, so I’m especially glad this week that today, it is indeed Friday. It’s always a pain when you wake up in the morning thinking it’s Friday, and then suddenly realize it’s a weekday earlier in the week. The opposite, however, is awesome. You know when you wake up Saturday or Sunday morning and think it’s a week day, and you have to wake up? And then you suddenly realize it’s actually Saturday/Sunday, and you can go back to sleep. Best realization ever!

I tried out a new recipe for dinner last night, courtesy of Our Best Bites. If you’ve never checked it out, it’s a great food blog done by two lovely ladies. I decided to try a recipe I found on their site for Asian Lettuce Wraps, and it turned out great! Hisa and I both really liked them.

We had to skip the cilantro (hard to come by in Japan, and expensive when you can find it), but they were still really good. A warning though, these are pretty messy to eat, whatever you’re level of lettuce wrapping (I’m a pretty good lettuce wrapper if I do say so myself, but they were still pretty messy). It’s totally worth making them, however, because they’re so good! Next time I make them (and there will be a next time), I think I’m going to try adding some peanuts to the chicken mix.

I served the lettuce wraps with a vegetable soup, but they’d also go great with steamed rice.

Check out the recipe here.

Happy cooking, and have a great weekend!

April 15, 2011 at 8:26 pm 3 comments

Homemade Tiramisu

I don’t remember the first time I ever had tiramisu, but I know I’ve loved it from the first time I tried it.

But seriously, is there anyone who doesn’t like tiramisu?

Mmmmm, tiramisu….

When it comes to deserts, I’m usually a devout chocolate-dessert eater, but there’s something magical about the combination of flavors and creamy, cool smoothness of tiramisu (I feel the same way about cheesecake, but I’ll save that for another day).

Although Japan has a plethora of French desserts available to the hungry consumer, there is (from my perspective) a sad lack of American and Italian desserts available here.

Sadly, that includes tiramisu. I’ve never seen it here in Japan before (albeit I’ve haven’t been to every store, cake shop, and Italian restaurant in Japan either), so when my husband asked for tiramisu for his birthday, I decided to make it myself.

**update** My husband informed me that, actually, tiramisu is super popular in Japan, and has been so since sometime during the 90’s. I obviously just didn’t notice. My bad!

If you have the right ingredients and an electric mixer, tiramisu is quite easy to make, and trust me, it’s so worth making.

Tiramisu

  • 3/4 c. espresso
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1/4 c. sugar
  • 1/4 c. marsala wine
  • 225 grams mascarpone cheese
  • 1/2 c. whipping cream (not whipped cream, and definitely not cool whip)
  • About 20 ladyfinger cookies
  • 1 Tbsp cocoa powder
  1. Prepare the espresso. Dissolve 1 tsp of sugar in it, and set aside to cool to room temperature.
  2. Beat the egg yolks in a double broiler until they become fluffy. Beat in the 1/4 c. sugar and the marsala wine.
  3. Transfer the bowl over a pan of simmering water and whisk the mixture until it thickens into a cream (just before boiling, when small bubbles appear).
  4. With a rubber spatula, mash the mascarpone cheese in a bowl until it becomes creamy. Add the egg/sugar/marsala wine mixture into the cheese and beat mixture until well combined.
  5. Whip the whipping cream in a separate bowl until light and fluffy. Fold the whipped cream into the filling until smooth.
  6. Lightly soak the ladyfingers in the espresso mixture one at a time. Place half of them in one layer on the bottom of a serving dish.
  7. Distribute half of the filling in an even layer over the ladyfingers. Repeat with a second layer of ladyfingers and the rest of the filling.
  8. Refrigerate for 3 – 4 hours. Sprinkle cocoa on top before serving.

April 14, 2011 at 12:54 pm Leave a comment

Quiche with Whole Wheat Crust

It’s certainly been bumpy around here in Japan since yesterday evening. We had a 7.1-magnitude after shock (causing me to run outside in my house slippers, twice), which triggered a series of after shocks from the after shock (after-after shocks?). Since the original 7.1 after shock yesterday evening, there has been one 6-magnitude after shock, seven 5-magnitude after shocks, and countless 4-magnitude after shocks. I somehow managed to get a good night’s sleep, so maybe I’m getting used to all this shaking. Who knows.

In other news, the weather here has been beautiful the past few days. The sakura (cherry blossom) trees are in full bloom now, so Sunday saw hanami (flower viewing) parties going on all over town. My husband, Hisa, and I rode around on our bicycles all afternoon enjoying the lovely weather, the beautiful sakura blossoms, and observing all the parties going on.

I love spring. It’s without a doubt my favorite season of the year. It’s not always fun, because I have horrible allergies, and everything blooming can cause severe discomfort to myself, but I love spring none-the-less.

Something I love to make in the spring time is quiche.

Actually, that’s a lie. I love to make quiche any season of the year. But quiche just somehow seems appropriate for spring, don’t you think? It’s light, but can be decadent, and you can fill it with lovely spring vegetables. It works for any season though, as you can put whatever vegetables are in season in it. It also works for any meal; breakfast, brunch, lunch, dinner. Take your pick. It’s super easy to make, but just about everyone loves it, and works great for dinner or as party food (mini-quiche anyone?). It is therefore, in my opinion, an essential dish to have in your cooking repertoire.

You can use your favorite pastry recipe, or if you don’t want to bother or simply don’t have time, you can just buy some frozen pie crusts (just check the ingredients before you buy it to make sure you’re getting one with simple ingredients and not a lot of weird additives). Throw in some vegetables that are in season (or whatever happens to be lying in the veggie drawer of your fridge), crack some eggs, pour in some milk/cream, and your good to go.

When I made this quiche, I used a yogurt pastry dough recipe from Nourishing Traditions. If you want a good whole-wheat flour pastry, this one is quite nice.


To begin, pre-heat your oven to 360 degrees F (180 degrees C). Mix 1/2 cup of whole plain yogurt and 1/2 cup (1/4 pound) softened butter in a large bowl, and cream the two together.


Add 1 3/4 c. whole wheat flour


And 1 tsp. of salt.


Then blend everything together until you have large clumps of dough like these.


With your hand, squeeze all the clumps together, until you have one ball of dough like this.


On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough to a circle large enough to fit in your pie dish. Cut off any extra dough, and flute the outer edge of the crust (or just use the back of a fork like I did).

Add whatever cooked veggies, meat, and spices you want. For mine, I used cooked diced onion, garlic, and eggplant; and some diced deli chicken meat. Always cook your meat and vegetables before you add it to the quiche. A lot of vegetables release water while baking (ex. spinach, mushroom, etc.)so if you don’t bake your veggies first, then you may end up with a watery quiche (and no one likes a watery quiche).

Add about 1/2 cup of shredded cheese (more or less, depending on your taste). In a small bowl, whisk 4 large eggs, 1 cup of milk or cream, and a good dash of salt and pepper. Pour the mixture into the pie crust over the meat/veggies/cheese, then carefully pop the whole thing in the oven, and bake for 45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.


Mmmmm, quiche!


Serve with a fresh salad and enjoy!

Eggplant Quiche with Whole Wheat Crust

(makes one, 9-inch quiche)

  • 1/2 c. yogurt
  • 1/2 c. (1/4 lb) butter, softened
  • 1 3/4 c. whole-wheat flour
  • 1 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/4 of a large onion, diced
  • 1 – 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 c. chicken deli meat, diced
  • 1/2 American eggplant, cubbed (or 2 Japanese eggplants, sliced)
  • 1/2 c. shredded cheese
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 c. milk or cream
  • salt & pepper
  1. Pre-heat oven to 360 degrees F (180 degrees C). In a large bowl, cream together yogurt and butter. Add flour and salt, and mix until large clumps of dough form. Squeeze together clumps with hand, until you have a large ball of dough.
  2. On a lightly floured surface, roll out pastry dough into a large circle (about 10 – 11 inches). Place in a non-greased pie dish, making sure the crust is flush against the pie dish (i.e. there are no air bubbles), then cut off any excess dough hanging over the edge of the dish. Flute the edge of the pie crust with fingers or back of fork.
  3. Heat 1 Tbsp. olive oil in a skillet over med. heat. Add onion and cook for 2 – 3 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another minute. Add the eggplant and cook until the eggplant is soft (about 5 – 7 minutes). Add a dash of salt and pepper.
  4. Scoop the onion,garlic, eggplant mix into the pie crust. Add the deli chicken meat and spread everything around evenly. Sprinkle the cheese on top.
  5. In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs and the milk/cream. Add a little salt and pepper and whisk again. Pour mixture over the veggies/meat/cheese in the pie dish.
  6. Carefully place in oven, and bake for 45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

April 12, 2011 at 12:49 pm Leave a comment

Quiche

It’s certainly been bumpy around here in Japan since yesterday evening. We had a 7.1-magnitude after shock (causing me to run outside in my house slippers, twice), which triggered a series of after shocks from the after shock (after-after shocks?). Since the original 7.1 after shock yesterday evening, there has been one 6-magnitude after shock, seven 5-magnitude after shocks, and countless 4-magnitude after shocks. I somehow managed to get a good night’s sleep, so maybe I’m getting used to all this shaking. Who knows.

In other news, the weather here has been beautiful the past few days. The sakura (cherry blossom) trees are in full bloom now, so Sunday saw hanami (flower viewing) parties going on all over town. My husband, Hisa, and I rode around on our bicycles all afternoon enjoying the lovely weather, the beautiful sakura blossoms, and observing all the parties going on.

I love spring. It’s without a doubt my favorite season of the year. It’s not always fun, because I have horrible allergies, and everything blooming can cause severe discomfort to myself, but I love spring none-the-less.

Something I love to make in the spring time is quiche.

Actually, that’s a lie. I love to make quiche any season of the year. But quiche just somehow seems appropriate for spring, don’t you think? It’s light, but can be decadent, and you can fill it with lovely spring vegetables. It works for any season though, as you can put whatever vegetables are in season in it. It also works for any meal; breakfast, brunch, lunch, dinner. Take your pick. It’s super easy to make, but just about everyone loves it, and works great for dinner or as party food (mini-quiche anyone?). It is therefore, in my opinion, an essential dish to have in your cooking repertoire.

You can use your favorite pastry recipe, or if you don’t want to bother or simply don’t have time, you can just buy some frozen pie crusts (just check the ingredients before you buy it to make sure you’re getting one with simple ingredients and not a lot of weird additives). Throw in some vegetables that are in season (or whatever happens to be lying in the veggie drawer of your fridge), crack some eggs, pour in some milk/cream, and your good to go.

When I made this quiche, I used a yogurt pastry dough recipe from Nourishing Traditions. If you want a good whole-wheat flour pastry, this one is quite nice.

To begin, pre-heat your oven to 360 degrees F (180 degrees C). Mix 1/2 cup of whole plain yogurt and 1/2 cup (1/4 pound) softened butter in a large bowl, and cream the two together.

Add 1 3/4 c. whole wheat flour

And 1 tsp. of salt.

Then blend everything together until you have large clumps of dough like these.

With your hand, squeeze all the clumps together, until you have one ball of dough like this.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough to a circle large enough to fit in your pie dish. Cut off any extra dough, and flute the outer edge of the crust (or just use the back of a fork like I did).

Add whatever cooked veggies, meat, and spices you want. For mine, I used cooked diced onion, garlic, and eggplant; and some diced deli chicken meat. Always cook your meat and vegetables before you add it to the quiche. A lot of vegetables release water while baking (ex. spinach, mushroom, etc.)so if you don’t bake your veggies first, then you may end up with a watery quiche (and no one likes a watery quiche).

Add about 1/2 cup of shredded cheese (more or less, depending on your taste). In a small bowl, whisk 4 large eggs, 1 cup of milk or cream, and a good dash of salt and pepper. Pour the mixture into the pie crust over the meat/veggies/cheese, then carefully pop the whole thing in the oven, and bake for 45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

Mmmmm, quiche!

Serve with a fresh salad and enjoy!

Eggplant Quiche

(makes one, 9-inch quiche)

  • 1/2 c. yogurt
  • 1/2 c. (1/4 lb) butter, softened
  • 1 3/4 c. whole-wheat flour
  • 1 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/4 of a large onion, diced
  • 1 – 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 c. chicken deli meat, diced
  • 1/2 American eggplant, cubbed (or 2 Japanese eggplants, sliced)
  • 1/2 c. shredded cheese
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 c. milk or cream
  • salt & pepper
  1. Pre-heat oven to 360 degrees F (180 degrees C). In a large bowl, cream together yogurt and butter. Add flour and salt, and mix until large clumps of dough form. Squeeze together clumps with hand, until you have a large ball of dough.
  2. On a lightly floured surface, roll out pastry dough into a large circle (about 10 – 11 inches). Place in a non-greased pie dish, making sure the crust is flush against the pie dish (i.e. there are no air bubbles), then cut off any excess dough hanging over the edge of the dish. Flute the edge of the pie crust with fingers or back of fork.
  3. Heat 1 Tbsp. olive oil in a skillet over med. heat. Add onion and cook for 2 – 3 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another minute. Add the eggplant and cook until the eggplant is soft (about 5 – 7 minutes). Add a dash of salt and pepper.
  4. Scoop the onion,garlic, eggplant mix into the pie crust. Add the deli chicken meat and spread everything around evenly. Sprinkle the cheese on top.
  5. In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs and the milk/cream. Add a little salt and pepper and whisk again. Pour mixture over the veggies/meat/cheese in the pie dish.
  6. Carefully place in oven, and bake for 45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

April 12, 2011 at 12:49 pm Leave a comment

Beef Stroganoff

There are a lot of people who have fond child-hood memories of home-cooked beef stroganoff that their moms made when they were kids.

I’m not one of those people. My mom probably made beef stroganoff at some point, but it was definitely a rare thing, as my dad is a vegetarian, and, thus, doesn’t do the whole beef thing (my mom made many other wonderful dishes for us growing up though).

A month or so back, however, for whatever reason, I decided I really wanted to eat beef stroganoff. Having never made beef stroganoff, I researched a bunch of recipes and found something that would work.

Now, if you live in Japan like me, you may be thinking, “But wait! Beef stroganoff! That has sour cream in it! This is Japan! I can’t get sour cream here!” If you live in Japan, but you do have access to sour cream that doesn’t cost an arm and a leg, I hate you (not really, but I do want you to give me all of your sour cream *desperate eyes*.).

Anyway, if you don’t have access to sour cream, or simply don’t want to use it because of it’s fat content, you can substitute the sour cream for yogurt (greek yogurt is especially good for this, because of it’s thickness). You really can’t tell much difference, other than the fact that the dish won’t be as rich.

One more thing, people seem to use egg noodles for beef stroganoff most of the time, but pasta works just as well.

This recipe seems to originate from an old Better Homes & Garden cookbook, but I’m not sure if it’s exactly like the original recipe.

Beef Stroganoff

  • 4 Tbsp. unbleached flour, divided
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 lb (about 453 grams) beef sirloin steak, cut into 1/4 in. strips
  • 5 Tbsp. butter, divided
  • 1 c. sliced mushrooms
  • 1/2 diced onion
  • 1 clove minced garlic
  • 1 Tbsp. tomato paste
  • 1 can (2 cups) beef broth
  • 1 c. sour cream or yogurt
  • 3 c. egg noodles or pasta
  • paprika for garnish (optional)
  1. Combine 1 Tbsp flour and the salt. Dredge meat in the flour mixture. Melt two Tbsp of butter in a large skillet over med heat, then and the beef, quickly browning on all sides.Remove from skillet.
  2. Add the mushrooms, onion, and garlic to the skillet, and cook until onion is tender, about 3 -4 minutes. Add 3 Tbsp butter to the pan. When melted, sprinkle 3 Tbsp of flour into the skillet and cook for 1 min. Add the tomato pasta and cook for another minute or two.
  3. Slowly pour in the broth while stirring constantly. Continue stirring until the sauce thickens. Return the meat to the skillet and simmer until the meat is heated through, about 2 minutes.
  4. Combine the sour cream or yogurt with a little bit of the hot broth (this will prevent it from curdling), then gradually add the sour cream to the skillet while stirring. Heat through but do not boil. Serve over cooked noodles/pasta. Garnish with paprika if desired.

April 8, 2011 at 3:44 pm 1 comment

Sweet & Sour Chicken and Veggie Stir-Fry

It seems that the vicinity of my apartment complex has become the place to be if your a female cat in heat these days.

It started out a few days ago with just one yowling cat. Annoying, yes, but manageable. Then came another yowling cat. They just sit together outside of my complex and yowl together. Day and night. Now I think there’s actually three of them. I think that maybe this is some kind of female-kitty-in-heat bonding or something.

cat 1: Um, like, are you in heat?

cat 2: Yeah.

cat 1: OMG, me TOO!

cat 3: No WAY! Me TOO!

cat 2: OMG, for realz?! We like, TOTALLY need to yowl together until we can gets us some man kitty!

cat 1: Like, totally!

cat 3: Fur sure!

What? So I imagine that the kitties outside of my apartment yowling incessantly talk with a valley girl accent. So what?

Don’t judge.

***

Moving on, while I was in the U.S., I ended up cooking quite a bit for my parents and husband. My mom doesn’t cook so much anymore since my brothers and I all left home (sorry Dad), and I enjoy cooking, so I was happy to cook for them. I even remembered to take pictures of most of the things I cooked, so I could blog about them later.

After we got back to Japan, however, it seems I somehow deleted all the pictures in a jet-lag induced haze… A 13+ hour flight will do that to ya. Trust me.

Fortunately, I have an older picture of one of the dishes I cooked while in the States: Sweet & Sour Chicken and Veggie Stir-fry

This picture makes me hungry…

I love stir-fries, and how you can include just about anything you want in them. I love having a lot of different vegetables and nuts in mine.

I’ve learned a few things about stir-fries though, mainly from messing them up a lot.

1) Always stir-fry things at a high temperature. You don’t want anything spontaneously combusting, but you do need a high heat to cook your veggies/meat quickly.

2) Because you cook stir-fries at a high temperature, you need to use an oil with a high smoke point. If you don’t, your oil will start to smoke from the high temperature, break down, and generally taste icky. So what are some oils with high smoke points good for stir-frying?

  • canola oil
  • coconut oil
  • peanut oil – I heard this is what Chinese cooks usually use, so I guess it’s bona fide. 😀
  • grape seed oil

What oils shouldn’t you use for stir-frying:

olive oil – low heat point, especially true for extra-virgin olive oil

sesame oil – good for flavoring after your done cooking, but not good for stir-frying

3) Either cook each vegetable/meat separately, or cook vegetables with a similar cooking time together. This prevents overcooking some vegetables, while others are still hard.

4) Don’t cook too large an amount of veggies/meat in your wok or pan at one time. If you have too many veggies in your pan, they’ll end up steaming rather than stir-frying, and they’ll lose their crunchiness. If you follow the previous tip though, you shouldn’t have a problem with this.

5) Once you start cooking, things go pretty quickly, so I find it’s easier to have everything cut up and ready to go before I start stir-frying.

6) Add nuts! Actually this is just my personal preference, but I think nuts always make stir-fries better, so add nuts! (unless of course you have a nut allergy, in which case you shouldn’t add nuts… please don’t sue me…)

Okay, that’s all the tips I can think of off the top of my head. If you have any more, please let me know! I’m by no means an expert on stir-fries, so I’m always happy to learn new tips if ya have ’em!

Okay, on to the recipe!

I don’t remember where I got this recipe, but I’ve altered it a bit over time to suit my tastes and preferences, so I suppose this is my version.

Sweet & Sour Chicken and Veggie Stir-Fry

  • 1 lb chicken, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 1 egg white
  • dash of salt
  • 2 tsp. corn starch
  • 1 10-ounce can of pineapple in juice
  • 1/4 c. juice from pineapple
  • 1/4 c. white vinegar (or rice vinegar)
  • 1/4 c. ketchup
  • 2 Tbsp. brown sugar
  • 1 Tbsp. corn starch
  • 1/2 c. of peanuts, cashews, or almonds (optional)
  • Veggies of your choice (Veggies I’ve used that work great: broccoli, onion, green bell pepper, red bell pepper, fresh green beans, sugar snap peas, carrots, fresh ginger, etc. Basically anything goes.)
  • Oil for stir-frying
  1. Combine egg white, dash of salt, and 2 tsp. corn starch in a wide, shallow bowl. Add chicken and mix until well coated. Set aside to marinate for 15 minutes.
  2. To make sweet & sour sauce, combine pineapple juice, vinegar, ketchup, brown sugar, and corn starch in a bowl and set aside (I usually cook a large amount of vegetables, so I often double the sauce).
  3. Cut up vegetables into bite-sized pieces, and cut pineapple into chunks.
  4. Heat a wok or skillet with a thick bottom until a drop of water sizzles and evaporates on it. Add 1 Tbsp. oil, then add chicken and spread it out so that the pieces are separated. Cook 1 – 2 minutes without stirring, then flip the chicken over and cook on opposite side 1 – 2 minutes. Stir chicken around and continue cooking until chicken is completely cooked through. Remove from skillet.
  5. Add another tablespoon of oil to the skillet and briefly fry nuts (or you can toast them). Remove from skillet.
  6. Begin stir-frying vegetables in batches, cooking vegetables with similar cooking times together, or stir-fry each vegetable separately. Stir-fry until still slightly crunchy. Add more oil when necessary.
  7. In a large pot, mix the chicken, veggies, nuts, pineapple chunks, and sweet and sour sauce, and toss until everything is well coated in sauce. Briefly heat mixture on medium/low heat until warmed through. Serve with steamed brown or white rice.

 

April 7, 2011 at 4:19 pm 2 comments

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About Me

My name is Rachel. I'm a small-town girl born and raised in Oklahoma, currently living in Japan, who likes cooking, baking, reading, working out, and traveling. Join me in my culinary adventures, my domestic doings, and the story of my life, one day at a time.

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